Two-Minute Read: Monochromatic Bedrooms

80 decades ago, when I was in middle-school, my parents moved to a house which allowed me and my sisters to each have a room of our own. My parents allowed us to paint our rooms any color that we wanted. At the time, I was ridiculously obsessed with Lisa Frank and I channeled her color palette when I chose the colors for my room. I decided that each of my bedroom walls needed to be a different color, which morphed into a sickly pastel version of Lisa Frank’s color range. Let’s just say the glow-up is real! 

As my design eye has matured, I’ve learned that there’s something soothing about monochromatic spaces. Whether the palette is light and airy or rich and robust, having a limited palette to consume is comforting. This is especially true for bedrooms. A place of refuge and relaxation, we want our bedrooms to be as peaceful as possible. Monochromatic design is all about not over-complicating things visually. And so it radiates a muted, calm energy that encompasses the room.

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Monochromatic design goes hand in hand with minimalism. Think of them as fraternal brothers, if you will. I recently wrote about minimalism and how it can cultivate an elegant environment. You all already know that I am a KonMari freak, and monochromatic design pairs really well with the concept of minimalism. If you are intentionally fostering a space that emanates a calming vibe, this can be achieved much easier when there is less to distract the eye. The space doesn’t have to be empty, but it should be aligned with the concept of not overly stimulating the brain. 

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When working with a monochromatic color scheme, one way to add some dimension and variety to the space is to really emphasize texture – which can be as bold or subtle as you want it to be. 

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Generally, with interior design we’re looking to emphasize the space, but the purpose of monochromatic design is practically the opposite. If you have sentimental things, pieces of artwork that you love, or family heirlooms … things that you really want to see in your space regularly, a monochromatic palette is the perfect canvas for them. Because the space itself is so unfussy that it allows for those things to take center-stage. Monochromatic design allows for you to focus on what matters in the space, more-so than the space itself.   

 

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